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Braich Goch Bunkhouse and Inn

Corris Wales

"The first choice for Hostel Accommodation"

Things to Do, Places to Go, Sights to See

Like an all seeing sentinel, it gazes out across land and sea, keeping a watchful eye over Snowdonia-Castell- y-Bere, once an impressive fortress built by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd in the early 13th century

Spectacularly sited Harlech Castle seems to grow naturally from the rock on which it is perched. Like an all seeing sentinel, it gazes out across land and sea, keeping a watchful eye over Snowdonia.

The English monarch Edward I built Harlech in the late 13th century to fulfil this very role. It was one of the most formidable of his 'iron ring' of fortresses designed to contain the Welsh in their mountain fastness.

Ironically, in 1404 it was taken by Welsh leader Owain Glyn Dwr who proceeded to hold a parliament here. A long siege here during the Wars of the Roses inspired the stirring song 'Men of Harlech'.

One Welsh castle sometimes overlooked by visitors is Castell- y-Bere, once an impressive fortress built by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd in the early 13th century. But what a marvelous, typically Welsh site for a castle! Embedded in the arms of the darkly foreboding, starkly greenish-gray landscape formed by rugged Cadair Idris and its mountainous cohorts near Abergynolwyn some 10 miles SW of Dolgellau, the greatly ruined Castell-y-Bere now lies isolated from the major communication routes across Wales, atop a steep-sided, flat-topped rock, perfectly situated to stand guard over the surrounding valley floor. The drive along the minor roadway to the site seems to go on forever, but the breath-taking spectacle of Cadair Idris, the "Chair of Idris", is in itself worth the jaunt. Legends have it that if you spend a night on the mountain, you will awake the next morning either a poet or a madman!

The genus Amanita contains about 600 species of agarics including some of the most toxic-Unfortunately, this butterfly has suffered a worrying decline, especially in the south, over the last few years.

The genus Amanita contains about 600 species of agarics including some of the most toxic known mushrooms found worldwide, as well as some well-regarded edible species. This genus is responsible for approximately 95% of the fatalities resulting from mushroom poisoning,

Native to conifer and deciduous woodlands throughout the temperate and boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including higher elevations of warmer latitudes in regions such as Hindu Kush, the Mediterranean and also Central America. A recent molecular study proposes that it had an ancestral origin in the Siberian–Beringian region in the Tertiary period, before radiating outwards across Asia, Europe and North America. This one was spotted ( no pun intended ) in the lower garden of the Braich Goch.

The Small Tortoiseshell is one of our most-familiar butterflies, appearing in gardens throughout the British Isles. Unfortunately, this butterfly has suffered a worrying decline, especially in the south, over the last few years. This butterfly has always fluctuated in numbers, but the cause of a recent decline is not yet known, although various theories have been proposed. One is the increasing presence of a particular parasitic fly, Sturmia bella, due to global warming - this species being common on the continent.

The Peacock is a familiar sight in gardens across the British Isles and is unmistakable, with quite spectacular eyes on the upperside of the hindwings that give this butterfly its name. This is a highly mobile butterfly that occurs throughout the British Isles

 

The Elephant Hawk Moth Catertpillar is common in gardens where they gorge themselves on fuchsia stems and leaves-Tornado

The Elephant Hawk Moth Catertpillar is common in gardens where they gorge themselves on fuchsia stems and leaves. Towards the end of August they're about fully grown, and so they're much more obvious. When they're ready to pupate they move down to the ground and shelter under dry leaves and bark.

Other regular visitors are the pilots of the RAF, USAF and the Luftwaffe amongst others. Other aircraft, increasing in noise level, are the Hawk Trainer and the Typhoon ( Euro fighter ). Another place to see these awsome aircraft is to make your way to Corris Corner ( Cader East ). To plan a vist contact us at the Braich and/or visit M J Aviation

Apache gun ship often flies below us at the Braich Goch-A different sound but still as noisy visitor is the Hercules.

A different sound but still as noisy visitor is the Hercules. Often flies much lower than the Tornado.

On the other hand the Apache gun ship often flies below us at the Braich Goch. The one featured here appeared below us and rose to level with the Braich Goch upper garden before descending back down to just above the river Dulas

More Aircraft piccies in our Gallery

Male and female Robins look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted-slow-worms are neither worms nor snakes, but are in fact lizards

Male and female Robins look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted with golden brown. Robins sing nearly all year round and despite their cute appearance, they are aggressively territorial and are quick to drive away intruders.

Despite their name and appearance, slow-worms are neither worms nor snakes, but are in fact lizards - they're given away by their ability to shed their tails and blink with their eyelids. They can be found in heathland, tussocky grassland, woodland edges and rides: anywhere they can find invertebrates to eat and a sunny patch in which to sunbathe

the species is unusual among reptiles for ‘giving birth’ to live young rather than laying eggs-Cadair Idris or Cader Idris is a mountain in Gwynedd, Wales, which lies at the southern end of the Snowdonia National Park near the town of Dolgellau.

The common lizard is the UK’s most common and widespread reptile. It is the only reptile native to Ireland. It is found across many habitats including heathland, moorland, woodland and grassland where it can be seen basking in sunny spots. Also known as the viviparous lizard, the species is unusual among reptiles for ‘giving birth’ to live young rather than laying eggs.

Cadair Idris or Cader Idris is a mountain in Gwynedd, Wales, which lies at the southern end of the Snowdonia National Park near the town of Dolgellau. The peak, which is one of the most popular in Wales for walkers and hikers, is composed largely of Ordovician igneous rocks, with classic glacial erosion features such as cwms, moraines, striated rocks, and roches moutonnées

Corris lies on the west bank of the Afon (river) Dulas, which here forms the county boundary between Gwynedd/Merionethshire and Powys/Montgomeryshire, Powys being to the east of the river-Sadly Go Ape is no longer situated in Coed y Brenin but it was fun while it lasted

Corris lies on the west bank of the Afon (river) Dulas, which here forms the county boundary between Gwynedd/Merionethshire and Powys/Montgomeryshire, Powys being to the east of the river. The Afon Deri (shown on early maps as the Afon Corris) runs through the village before joining the Dulas. The ancient Roman road between northern and southern Roman Wales, Sarn Helen, probably ran through the village. The settlement now known as Corris was at one time known as Abercorris (spelt Abercorys on some early maps), when the old turnpike road from Dolgellau to Machynlleth ran through the village. The modern A487 trunk road was built by the quarry owners in the 1840s and bypasses the village.

Sadly Go Ape is no longer situated in Coed y Brenin but it was fun while it lasted

Walkers who perhaps categorise themselves as enthusiastic beginners, or at intermediate level, could manage the ascent to Llyn Cau-Corris Craft Centre boasts 8 individual craft studios

Walkers who perhaps categorise themselves as enthusiastic beginners, or at intermediate level, could manage the ascent to Llyn Cau, a glacial lake, with relative ease. It's the climb to the summit from here that is more precarious and is best left to the more experienced and hard-bitten rambler

Corris Craft Centre Situated in Southern Snowdonia in Mid Wales the Corris Craft Centre boasts 8 individual Craft Studios – which are octagonal shaped pods bursting with creativity – where you can meet the talented designer-makers and buy their handmade items. Perfect for finding a special something, inspired by, and handmade in Wales. There’s lots of opportunities for hands-on fun too, a surprisingly great way to unwind and have some fun with your own clever creations to take home.

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On 25th March 2016, Dyfi Distillery launched their first gin, Dyfi Original. Combining some fabulous juniper, with other classic botanicals, and those foraged in the Biosphere, Dyfi Original Gin is already demonstrating the precision approach their Colorado-built micro stills can achieve. This is their interpretation of a very classic gin style, with juniper- and bog myrtle-forward character, bottled at 45%. It is really delicious chilled and neat, or as a 1:3 G&T, simply garnished with a sprig or two of fresh dill. Available for sale at the cellar door in Corris.

The trips start with the equipment, proper mining gear -a unique visitor attraction which takes you,

With the Corris Mine Explorers The trips start with the equipment, proper mining gear including a hard hat, cap lamp, safety clips and a battery pack. Equipped and ready, you enter the mine; it’s dark and damp and you explore the route of entry hand dug by Victorian miners, with just the shallow light from your cap lamp.

King Arthur’s Labyrinth is a unique visitor attraction which takes you, on a boat, through a magical waterfall and deep into the mountains of Southern Snowdonia

Built originally in 1859 as a horse hauled tram road-a pair of zip lines a mile long, where riders can

The Corris Railway was the first Narrow Gauge railway in Mid-Wales. Built originally in 1859 as a 2’ 3" gauge horse-hauled tramroad, steam locomotives arrived in 1878 and passengers were carried from 1883 to 1930. The Railway closed in 1948 and was dismantled soon afterwards.

The Corris Railway Museum opened in 1970 and passenger services recommenced in 2002, with regular steam-hauled services returning in 2005, operated by volunteer members of the Corris Railway Society.

Zip World won international acclaim when it opened Zip World Velocity at Bethesda in March 2013. It includes a pair of zip lines a mile long, where riders can exceed 100mph, 500ft high and experience the nearest thing to flying

The all new Bounce Below will be BIGGER, BETTER and -From the rolling hills and mountains to the tranquil

The all new Bounce Below will be BIGGER, BETTER and BOUNCIER! After almost two incredible years of bouncing below, we’ve decided it’s time to go bigger, faster and bouncier. We’re building bigger slides made of metal which will be double the fun and triple the speed. We are expanding into previously untouched sections of the caverns and adding new and bouncier nets.

From the rolling hills and mountains to the tranquil golden beachfront and stunning sunsets, the Cardigan Bay Coastline is known across the World for its vast beauty – and Tywyn, right in the heart of Wales where the mountains meet the sea, is no exception.

The little seaside resort of Borth is situated on Cardigan  bay -Ynyslas dunes are remarkable. They are still growing,

The little seaside resort of Borth is situated on Cardigan Bay, near the northernmost point of the County of Ceredigion in West Wales, in the far west of the United Kingdom.

The whole Reserve is made up of three parts: Cors Fochno, an internationally important peat bog; Dyfi Estuary, an internationally important feeding ground for thousands of wading birds and the beach and sand dunes of Ynyslas, enjoyed by around quarter of a million people every year.

Ynyslas dunes are remarkable. They are still growing, day by day, millimetre by millimetre, providing a home for many rare plants and insects. When you visit, you can see the process taking place. Earth, sea and wind in action. In the summer, the sand dunes are transformed into a colourful carpet of wild flowers and are especially renowned for their rare orchids.

Osprey observatory at the dYFI oSPREY PROJECT-Aberystwyth Prom and Beach

Osprey Centre

Ospreys have been seen regularly on the Dyfi Estuary for many years during the spring and autumn migration seasons. On 14th September 2004, during the early years of satellite tracking, a Scottish juvenile osprey known as SSK gave a transmission showing she was passing the Dyfi estuary on her first winter migration. Another satellite tracked two year old male, “Rothiemurcus”, passed Machynlleth on 31st May 2011 as he returned to the UK for the first time. In 2007, the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust put up an artificial nest on our Cors Dyfi/Morfa Dyfi reserve in an attempt to attract ospreys to stay and hopefully breed and start a new colony in Mid-Wales.

Aberystwyth

Aberystwyth is the principal holiday resort and administrative centre of the west coast of Wales. It is also home to the University of Wales Aberystwyth and the National Library.
The town is nestled between three hills and two beaches, and hosts some castle ruins, a pier and a harbour. The surrounding hills hold the visible remains of a iron age fort and also a monument to Wellington and once climbed offer stunning views of Cardigan Bay.

The Tan y Coed Picnic site is located amongst beech woods and is the starting point for two woodland and riverside walks along the stream of Cwm Cadian-Confusing Directions Geocache Site

Geocaching

Geocaching is the real-world treasure hunt that's happening right now, all around you. There are 2,777,041 active geocaches and over 15 million geocachers worldwide.

The Tan y Coed Picnic site is located amongst beech woods and is the starting point for two woodland and riverside walks along the stream of Cwm Cadian. For families, there is an animal puzzle trail and a free leaflet is available on site. Cwm Cadian Trail (1 mile, 1.6 kilometres). This moderate walk passes through a beech woodland and alongside the river Cadian with its waterfall and pools.

At the Centre for Alternative Technology, there is a wholly vegetarian restaurant. Catering for our own MSc. students, staff and people participating on our short courses-the town of Machynlleth has a lot of history. It is here that Owain Glyndwr was crowned Prince of Wales in 1404

At the Centre for Alternative Technology, there is a wholly vegetarian restaurant. Catering for our own MSc. students, staff and people participating on our short courses

Considering its size, the town of Machynlleth has a lot of history. It is here that Owain Glyndwr was crowned Prince of Wales in 1404 in the presence of leaders from Scotland, Spain and France and he established his parliament in the town.

 

The Owain Glyndwr Centre is built on the site of the famous parliament held in 1404 at which Owain was crowned Prince of Wales. This Grade 1 listed building was given to the town of Machynlleth by Lord Davies of Llandinam in February, 1912.

The Centre hosts a new interactive and informative exhibition on the life, times and vision of Owain Glyndwr - rebel leader, national hero and self appointed prince of Wales at the beginning of the fifteenth century.

Aberdyfi ( Aberdovey )

Aberdovey is a small peaceful seaside village nestling on the north side of the Dyfi estuary. A popular resort for many years it has a thriving little harbour and sits within Snowdonia National Park, where the river Dyfi meets the blue waters of Cardigan Bay.

Aberdovey is a haven for those wanting to spend an energetic holiday. It has watersports galore, including sailing, sailboarding, fishing, boat trips and the summer regatta. It also has an 18 hole championship golf course.

Barmouth

Barmouth's location on the west coast of North Wales and lying between a mountain range and the sea on the mouth of the river Mawddach is arguably one of the most beautiful locations in Wales. It rests just within the south west corner of Snowdonia National Park and is seeped in a history rich with connections to the shipping and slate industries.


 

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"Corris lies in the centre of Outdoor Heaven and The Braich is in the centre of Corris"

Braich Goch Bunkhouse and Inn, Corris, Machynlleth, Powys, SY20 9RD Tel 01654761229

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